Chicken

Folks it’s muddy here.  And rainy, windy, sleet-y.  You name it, it’s been nasty.  But we haven’t stopped.  What you see above is not our new and improved efforts to play in the mud.  Those, dear reader, are footers for our new brooder.

Footers?

Yes.  We dug narrow ditches eight inches deep between those posts, then nailed boards on the sides of the posts and filled it all with concrete.  Why?  Because dogs, skunks, raccoons and rats don’t care how much you spent on your 500 chicks.  They just want a way to them and digging, is often the easiest.

On top of these footers we will build our walls.  In between the footers we will fill the floor with woodchips and hope to end up with a brooder for the baby chicks that has much more room and much better airflow than models 1.0 and 2.0.  We’ll see.

While the brooder is still empty, we’ve already filled it with plans.  It’ll host 300 chicks beginning March 15 and it will see red and white birds pass through, as well as a secret, experimental breed that’s actually been dubbed ‘the royalty of chicken’.  Really.  Chicken royalty right here on our farm.

We also have some new volunteer helpers building this brooder and their response to working with us has made me think that maybe I’ve missed something.  That something is offering you all, our dear readers, the opportunity to join us here.  If you would like to come and volunteer your help to build a brooder, stretch a fence, feed a cow, or water chicks, give us a ring.  While it may sound scheming, I assure you I’m not.  Modern urban life so separates us from the land that most of us honestly don’t know why our parents and grandparents were so attached to certain places.

Maybe I’m waxing poetic, but I remember my late father-in-law and his yard.  If it wasn’t raining he was out working in it – not to save money – but because he loved it.  I wondered at it for awhile – the why of it.  It was a lot of, well, work, afterall.  Finally it dawned on me.  He, and all the other lawn warriors across the globe, are trying to re-attach a connection broken by our modern industrial and corporate world – a connection many of us unknowingly need with the soil, the land, with creation.  We have reattached some of that connection here.  If you’d like to come enjoy a bit of it with us, we’d love to have you.